Content Advisory:

Signature Series

We provide content advisory information as a service and do our best to inform guests as to content. Please bear in mind that the question of what is or isn’t offensive is an extremely subjective one, particularly when it comes to determining the appropriateness of plays for youth. If you have any concerns about a play’s appropriateness, we strongly encourage you to read this guide carefully, view our website guide, and/or read the script before purchasing tickets.

What follows is a detailed list of items that have been found offensive by some in the past. If you have concerns about content, feel free to look over this page; however, please keep in mind that the words listed – taken out of context – may seem more offensive than they would in the context of the play.

Please Note: Orlando Shakes allows children age five and older into our Signature Series performances. For our Children’s Series performances, children two years of age and younger are welcome to sit on laps for the entirety of the performance. Children three and older must have a ticket.

Spoilers ahead! To give you the best idea of what to expect, our summaries feature plot spoilers. The content listed below has been created before the show opens, so we are unable to list every objectionable moment that may occur during the performance.

2019-2020 Signature Series

Full Content Advisories coming soon.

Evita

PG-13

SYNOPSIS: Evita is based on the historical story of María Eva Duarte de Perón, a poor Argentinian girl who grows up to be the wife of the president of Argentina, worshipped by her people. As a young woman who longs for an acting career, fame, and fortune, Eva quickly learns that her feminine wiles hold power among a culture, and a political system, run by men. Once she makes it to Buenos Aires, Evita finds fame and power in her powers of seduction, eventually seducing the rising political figure, Juan Perón, who becomes the President of Argentina. As First Lady of Argentina, she aligns herself with the poor, winning herself, and Perón, popularity among Argentinians. Evita becomes a hero to the poor and the working class­—and an enemy to the rich. A young and unknown revolutionary, Ché, narrates the rise and fall of the beloved matriarch of the Argentinian people. This blockbuster musical, made even more famous as a 1996 Hollywood film starring Madonna and Antonio Banderas, shows both the righteous determination, and the ruthless power, of Argentina’s 20th century matriarch.

LANGUAGE: Three/four uses each of “b**ch”, “d**n”, “slut”, “whore”, and “a*s”. In one song, the middle-finger gesture is made three/four times, perhaps to sexual connotation.

DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO: People are seen drinking and smoking briefly on occasion.

SEXUAL THEMES: A woman sleeps her way to the top of the social ladder, with a whole song devoted to her moving from lover to lover. The song uses light innuendos and the F-you gesture four times, perhaps with sexual connotation. There are some suggestive dance moves.

VIOLENCE: Scenes of beatings and fights are seen. Bodies of victims in one of the fights are seen. There are bombings, an earthquake, gunshots, beatings, etc. Mainly mild and short.

UPSETTING CONTENT: Eva dies of cervical cancer. It is very sad and intense.

FOR WHICH AUDIENCES: Evita is an adult musical. It is most appropriate for 8th graders and up.

RATING: If it were a movie, Evita would be rated “PG-13”. Children under 5 will not be admitted to the theater.

Macbeth

PG-13

SYNOPSIS: Three witches decide to confront the great Scottish general Macbeth on his victorious return from a war between Scotland and Norway. The Scottish king, Duncan, decides that he will confer the title of the traitorous Cawdor on the heroic Macbeth. Macbeth, and another General called Banquo, happen upon the three witches. The witches predict that he will one day become king. He decides that he will murder Duncan. Macbeth’s wife agrees to his plan. He then murders Duncan assisted by his wife who smears the blood of Duncan on the daggers of the sleeping guards. A nobleman called Macduff discovers the body. Macbeth kills the guards insisting that their daggers smeared with Duncan’s blood are proof that they committed the murder. The crown passes to Macbeth. More murders ensue and the bloodied ghost of Banquo appears to Macbeth. Lady Macbeth’s conscience now begins to torture her and she imagines that she can see her hands covered with blood. She commits suicide. Macduff kills Macbeth and becomes king.

LANGUAGE: Elizabethan curse words.

ALCOHOL: Characters are seen drinking wine.

SEXUAL THEMES: There are sexually suggestive scenes. No nudity.

VIOLENCE: There is stage violence, battle, blood, and murder. A number of characters are murdered, including young children.

FRIGHTENING CONTENT: There are intense battle scenes. There are scary scenes with witches. The murder scenes are frightening as is the attack on a household as everybody, including children, are slaughtered.

FOR WHICH AUDIENCES: Macbeth is a tragedy fueled by greed, betrayal and madness. There are battle scenes. The play is best suited for 8th graders and up.

RATING: If it were a movie, Macbeth would be rated “PG-13”. Children under 5 will not be admitted to the theater.

Miss Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley

PG

SYNOPSIS: A sequel to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice set two years after the novel ends, Miss Bennet continues the story, only this time with bookish middle-sister Mary as its unlikely heroine. Mary is growing tired of her role as dutiful middle sister in the face of her siblings’ romantic escapades. When the family gathers for Christmas at Pemberley, an unexpected guest sparks Mary’s hopes for independence, an intellectual match, and possibly even love.

ROMANTIC THEMES: Dialogue includes discussion of relationships and marriage.

FOR WHICH AUDIENCES: Miss Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley is a holiday story of romance and manners. It is most appropriate for 6th graders and up.

RATING: If it were a movie, Miss Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley would be rated “PG”. Children under 5 will not be admitted to the theater.

Becoming Dr. Ruth

PG-13

WARNING: Strong sexual content

SYNOPSIS: Everyone knows Dr. Ruth Westheimer from her career as a pioneering radio and television sex therapist. Few, however, know the incredible journey that preceded it. From fleeing the Nazis in the Kindertransport and joining the Haganah in Jerusalem as a sniper, to her struggle to succeed as a single mother newly-arrived in America, Mark St. Germain deftly illuminates this remarkable woman’s untold story. Becoming Dr. Ruth is filled with the humor, honesty, and life-affirming spirit of Karola Ruth Siegel, the girl who became “Dr. Ruth,” America’s most famous sex therapist.

SEXUAL THEMES: The character or Dr. Ruth answers caller’s questions about sex frankly and in detail. There are a number of specific sexual references and clinical references to sexual anatomy, arousal, sex, and orgasm. There are references to pre-marital sex.

VIOLENT REFERENCES: The main character describes fleeing the Nazis and her friends and family who did not survive the Holocaust. Dr. Ruth is a victim of an explosion in Israel and describe her wounds and those of others.

FOR WHICH AUDIENCES: Becoming Dr. Ruth is an inspirational story about a woman who survived with courage. It is also a frank discussion of sexual relations. This performance is not recommended for children under 13. We recommend that children 13 to 17 years old be accompanied by an adult. There will be no school field trips for this production.

RATING: Due to the language, if it were a movie, Becoming Dr. Ruth would be rated “PG-13”. Children under 5 will not be admitted to the theater.

The Three Musketeers

PG-13

SYNOPSIS: It’s all for one and fun for all when Alexandre Dumas’ legendary tale comes to life on the stage. When a young man, D’Artagnan, arrives in Paris to join the King’s musketeers, he soon finds himself caught up in political plots, romance, and of course multiple sword fights. The three best of the Musketeers – Athos, Porthos, and Aramis – join D’Artagnan to foil the Cardinal Richelieu and his evil henchmen Rochefort and the diabolical Lady DeWinter.

LANGUAGE: Very mild profanity, such as “God” and “hell”.

ALCOHOL: Characters drink wine.

SUGGESTIVE THEMES: There are sexually suggestive scenes and kissing. No nudity.

VIOLENCE: There are many combat scenes and sword fighting happens in almost every scene. Many fighters are either wounded or die. D’Artagnan’s love, Constance, is poisoned and dies.

FOR WHICH AUDIENCES: The Three Musketeers is a swashbuckling story of valour and romance. The play is best suited for 8th graders and up.

RATING: If it were a movie, The Three Musketeers would be rated “PG-13”. Children under 5 will not be admitted to the theater.

Henry IV, Part 1

PG-13

SYNOPSIS: The heir to the throne, Prince Hal, defies his father, King Henry, by spending his time at Mistress Quickly’s tavern in the company of the dissolute Falstaff and his companions. The King is threatened by a rebellion led by Hal’s rival, Hotspur, his father Northumberland and his uncle Worcester. In the face of this danger to the state, Prince Hal joins his father to defeat the rebels at the Battle of Shrewsbury and kills Hotspur in single combat.

LANGUAGE: Elizabethan curse words.

ALCOHOL: Characters are seen drinking wine.

SEXUAL THEMES: There are sexually suggestive scenes. No nudity.

VIOLENCE: Characters are stabbed and die in Elizabethan battles.

FOR WHICH AUDIENCES: Henry IV, Part 1 is a history play about politics and violence. There are battle scenes. The play is best suited for Grade 8 and up.

RATING: If it were a movie, Henry IV, Part 1 would be rated “PG-13”. Children under 5 will not be admitted to the theater.

My Lord, What a Night

PG-13

SYNOPSIS: When famed African-American singer Marian Anderson is refused lodging because of her ethnicity, she finds an unlikely friend in Albert Einstein. Quick witted debates attempt to solve the nation’s problems over tea. Inspired by true events, this story explores the racial, religious, and gender-based struggles plaguing two of the most iconic entities of the 20th century.

LANGUAGE: Racist and anti-semitic references. (“One newspaper there described me as a chocolate bar! Another compared me to café au lait!”) (“When I first arrived in Princeton, the newspaper published a headline announcing that I had purchased a hairbrush!”) Mild language. (“I refuse to join the guild of whores!”)

VIOLENT REFERENCES: Characters recount hate crimes and violence against African Americans and Jews.

FOR WHICH AUDIENCES: My Lord, What A Night is a historical drama. The play is best suited for 8th grade and up.

RATING: If it were a movie, My Lord, What A Night would be rated “PG-13.” Children under 5 will not be admitted to the theater.

Bare Bard: Henry IV, Part 2

PG-13

SYNOPSIS: In the aftermath of the Battle of Shrewsbury, Northumberland learns of the death of his son, Hotspur. The Lord Chief Justice attempts, on behalf of the increasingly frail King, to separate the drunken Falstaff from Prince Hal. The rebels continue to plot insurrection. Falstaff is sent to recruit soldiers and takes his leave of his mistress, Doll Tearsheet. The rebel forces are overcome. This brings comfort to the dying King, who is finally reconciled to his son. Falstaff rushes to Hal’s coronation with expectations of high office, but is rejected by the newly crowned Henry V.

LANGUAGE: Elizabethan curse words.

ALCOHOL: Characters are seen drinking wine.

SUGGESTIVE THEMES: There are sexually suggestive scenes. No nudity.

VIOLENCE: There are several large battles onstage and one on one duels as well. Characters are stabbed and die in combat.

FOR WHICH AUDIENCES: Henry IV, Part 2 is a history of politics and violence. There are battle scenes. The play is best suited for ages 13 and up.

RATING: If it were a movie, Henry IV, Part 2 would be rated “PG-13”. Children under 5 will not be admitted to the theater.

2018-2019 Signature Series

Richard II

PG-13

SYNOPSIS: In Richard II, anger at a king’s arbitrary rule leads to his downfall—and sets in motion a decades-long struggle for the crown. Richard II begins as Richard’s cousin, Henry Bolingbroke, charges Thomas Mowbray with serious crimes, including the murder of the Duke of Gloucester. Bolingbroke’s father, John of Gaunt, privately blames the king for Gloucester’s death. At Richard’s command, Bolingbroke and Mowbray prepare for a trial by combat. The king halts the fight at the last minute, banishing both men from England. When John of Gaunt dies, Richard seizes his possessions to finance a war in Ireland, thus dispossessing Bolingbroke. Bolingbroke returns to England, quickly gathering support. By the time Richard returns from Ireland, many of his former allies have joined Bolingbroke. Richard is forced by Bolingbroke to abdicate, yielding the crown. Richard is held prisoner and murdered by one of Bolingbroke’s followers. Bolingbroke becomes King Henry IV.

LANGUAGE: Elizabethan curse words.

DRUG REFERENCES: Drugs are mentioned.

VIOLENCE: There is stage violence and death using swords. Richard II is murdered.

FOR WHICH AUDIENCE: Richard II is a history play. The play is best suited for 8th grade and up.

RATING: If it were a movie, Richard II would be rated “PG-13.”